Poverty

MDG 1: Poverty

1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger

1.A Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people whose income is less than $1.25 a day

1.B Achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all, including women and young people

1.C Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people who suffer from hunger

The number one problem when the MDGs were established was deemed to be Poverty. So it was put in the list as the number one.

From the UN MDG – Poverty web site:

  1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger

    1. Halve between 1990 and 2015 the proportion of people whose income is less than $1.25 a day.

      1. The target of reducing extreme poverty rates by half was met five years ahead of the 2015 deadline

      2. The global poverty rate at $1.25 a day fell in 2010 to less than half the 1990 rate. 700 million fewer people lived in conditions of extreme poverty in 2010 than in 1990. However at the global level, 1.2 billion people are still living in extreme poverty.

    2. Achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all, including women and young people

      1. Globally, 384 million workers lived below the $1.25 a day poverty line in 2011 – a reduction of 294 million since 2001

      2. The gender gap in employment persists with a 24.8 percentage point difference between men and women in the employment-to-population ratio in 2012.

    3. Halve between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people who suffer from hunger

      1. The hunger reduction target is within reach by 2015

      2. Globally, about 870 million people are estimated to be undernourished

      3. More than 100 million children under age five are still undernourished and underweight

The following is from the Millennium Development Goals – 2013 (published by the United Nations)

Fast Facts

  • Poverty rates have been halved, and about 700 million fewer people lived in conditions of extreme poverty in 2010 than in 1990

  • The economic and financial crisis has widened the global jobs gap ty 67 million people

  • One in eight people still go to bed hungry, despite major progress

  • Globally, nearly one in six children under age five are underweight; one in four are stunted

  • An estimated 7 per cent of children under age five worldwide are now overweight, another aspect of malnutrition; one quarter of these children live in sub-Saharan Africa

Goal 1.A – Halve number of people with income less than $1.25 a day

Goal 1.A: Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people whose income is less than $1.25 a day

Extreme poverty rates have fallen in every developing region, with one country, China leading the way. In China, extreme poverty dropped from 60 per cent in 1990 to 16 per cent in 2005 and 12 per cent in 2010. However poverty remains widespread in areas like sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia. In Southern Asia, the poverty rates fell by an average of one percentage point annually – 51 per cent in 1990 and 30 per cent 20 years later in 2010. However the poverty level I sub-Saharan Africa only dropped a total of 8 per centage points during the same time frame – from 56% to 48%. Nearly half the people here are still mired in extreme poverty.

Around the world, extreme poverty is found in areas where poor health and lack of education deprive people of productive employment; environmental resources have been depleted or spoiled; and corruption, conflict and bad governance waste public resources and discourage private investment.

Goal 1.B – Full employment including women and young people

Goal 1.B: Achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all, including women and young people.

The slowing of economic growth spells continued job losses, with young people bearing the brunt of the crisis.

According to the International Labor Organization (ILO), unemployment has increased by 28 million since 2007, and an estimated 39 million people have dropped out of the labor market, leaving a 67 million jobs gap as a result of the global economic and financial crisis. Young people have borne the brunt of the crisis. Negative labor market trends for youth accounted for 41 per cent of the decline in the global employment-to-population ratio since 2007 due to rising unemployment and falling participation.

These figures underscore the urgent need to improve productivity, promote sustainable structural transformation and expand social protection systems to ensure basic social services for the poor and most vulnerable workers and their families.

Goal 1.C – Halve Hunger

Goal 1.C: Halve, between 1990 and 2015 the proportion of people who suffer from hunger

The target reduction  is within reach if recent slowdowns in progress can be reversed.

About one in eight people worldwide did not consume enough food on a regular basis to cover their minimum dietary energy requirements over the period 2010 to 2012. The vast majority of the chronically undernourished reside in developing countries. However the proportion of undernourished people in developing regions has decreased from 23.2 per cent in 1990 to 14.9 per cent in 2012.

Progress has been made in several of the regions, but Western Asia is the only region that has seen a rise in the prevalence of undernourishment from 1990 to 2012. Behind these regional disparities are vastly different levels of vulnerability and markedly different capacities to deal with economic shocks, such as food price increases and economic recessions.

Despite steady gains, one in four children around the world show signs of stunted growth. (Stunted growth is defined as inadequate length or height for their age, captures early chronic exposure to under nutrition. Analysis shows that children in the poorest households are more than twice as likely to be stunted as children from the richest households.

The number of people uprooted by conflict or persecution is at its highest level in 18 years. Most refugees, excluding Palestinian refugees, originate from Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, the Sudan, and the Syrian Arab Republic (55 percent). Most of these refugees live in refugee camps where the food, health, and education is provided by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and served by NGOs. Developing regions carry the heaviest burden in hosting these uprooted refugees.

Add your comment